Bipartisan DACA plan unveiled

A compromise plan on immigration that would affect the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and border security has been unveiled by a bipartisan pair of House members, CNN reports. Texas Republican Will Hurd and California Democrat Pete Aguilar have been “quietly working for weeks” on the legislation, according to CNN. Both Representatives say they hope their proposal can speed up talks revolving around how to handle “Dreamers,” or young undocumented immigrants who were brought to the US as children.

4 possible DACA options as deadline nears

Starting next March, almost 1,000 people per day could begin losing their protected status as their Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) permits begin expiring after two years, CNN reports. Congress is considering four possible replacements for the DACA which would allow qualified applicants a chance to stay in the country legally. CNN takes a look at the four proposals in this story.

Law-abiding immigrants hurt by Trump’s tough talk

President Donald TrumpAn editorial at The Washington Post points out that “the overwhelming majority of illegal immigrants in the United States have no criminal record.” But that hasn’t slowed the work of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents who are rounding up “not just criminal undocumented immigrants, but law-abiding ones as well.” Of the approximately 143,000 immigrants arrested by ICE in the past year, more than 25% had no criminal convictions. Most were guilty of non-violent crimes. The Post‘s Editorial Board examines the issues legal immigrants face in this editorial.

Mexico border arrests drop sharply under Trump

Mexico mapThe Department of Homeland Security reports that arrests of people trying to sneak across the US-Mexico border have dropped to their lowest levels in 46 years. The Washington Post reports that “During the government’s 2017 fiscal year, which ended Sept. 30, U.S. border agents made 310,531 arrests, a decline of 24 percent from the previous year and the fewest overall since 1971.” While the drop may be credited to President Trump’s tough talk about beefing up border security, in May the number of border arrests started climbing again. Meanwhile, the number of arrests of undocumented immigrants has risen 42 percent in the past year, according to Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). Read more about the numbers at The Washington Post.

How the undocumented are treated in federal prisons

A commentary at The Marshall Project claims that undocumented immigrants in the federal prison system aren’t given the same “work and self-improvement opportunities” offered to citizens. Jacob Shuman says, “The truth is that the BOP discriminates against undocumented people by denying them access to essential drug counseling and job training in prison.” Shuman also says it’s time for the Bureau of Prisons to reform the exclusionary policies, which he calls “both ineffective and inhumane.” Read more of Shuman’s commentary here.

Immigrants warned about scam artists promising legal status for cash

immigration and crime

Immigrants who are in America illegally rarely report consumer crimes, especially if they’re worried that it could expose their immigration status, according to attorneys and advocates. That makes them particularly vulnerable to scammers who claim they can help keep undocumented immigrants in the country in exchange for cash. It’s a crime commonly referred to as “notario fraud.” The Chicago Tribune has more about the scams in this story.

A former undocumented immigrant talks about experience

As immigrant families continue to live in fear because of the Trump administration’s crackdown, D.C.’s school superintendent talks about her own experiences as an undocumented immigrant. Hanseul Kang didn’t learn she was undocumented until she was 16, when she began to realize the disadvantages of her status. Kang writes about her experience in The Washington Post.

The criminalization of immigration in the United States

Studies over the past century have examined the issue of crimes being committed by immigrants, and they have confirmed two truths: immigrants are less likely to commit crimes than natural-born Americans; and high rates of immigration are associated with lower crime rates. Walter Ewing, Ph.D., Daniel E. Martínez, Ph.D. and Rubén G. Rumbaut, Ph.D. have researched the issue, and have a report on their studies at the American Immigration Council’s website. A PDF of the report is available for download here.