Trump’s threats to DACA

undocumented immigrantsOver the weekend, President Donald Trump tweeted that there would be “NO MORE DACA DEAL” and blamed the failure on Democrats. At CNN, attorney Raul Reyes writes that Trump is ignorant of the nation’s immigration laws, pointing out that it was Trump himself who ended DACA in September of last year. Reyes says there has never been any realistic chance that a DACA deal could be struck. Read more about Reyes’ opinion at CNN.

The Washington Post also has analysis of Trump’s threats to DACA and how it reflects his presidency.

A ‘dreamer’ waits and watches the clock run out

immigration and crimeLeezia Dhalla is a ‘dreamer,’ one of thousands of immigrants who were brought to this country as children. Her legal protections under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals run out in less than two months. She has lived in the US for 22 years, immigrating to Texas in 1996, but unless Congress does something soon to decide what will happen to her and other ‘dreamers,’ Dhalla will be forced to leave the nation she loves, as she told The Washington Post:

My employer will have to let me go; I won’t have a way to pay my rent; my family and friends will be inconsolable, knowing that I can be deported at any time. They’re the ones whose lives will be disrupted, alongside mine, if I’m deported to a country I barely remember. After 22 years of living the United States, my future — and the futures of about 800,000 young Americans like me — is in total limbo.

Dhalla says it’s an understatement to say that she and other ‘dreamers’ are disappointed in the lack of action by politicians to resolve the crisis. Read more about her personal story at The Washington Post.

Immigration advocate says ‘dreamers’ need more cities and states willing to defy Trump

CongressWhile a bipartisan bill introduced in Congress aims to address two of the more pressing issues on immigration, a path to citizenship for ‘dreamers’ and spending more on border security along the Mexican border with the US, the proposal may not have a good chance of getting President Trump’s signature. If Washington is unable to agree on a solution to the expiration of the DACA program in March, one immigration advocate is calling on cities, counties and states to find the courage to stand up to the Trump administration’s tougher policies and actions on immigration. Juan Escalante says with some states like Florida considering their own stricter immigration legislation, more states need to step up on behalf of dreamers like New York, New Jersey and California. You can read more in Escalante’s column at HuffPost.

‘Dreamer’ application deadline Thursday

undocumented immigrantsAfter the Trump administration ended the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program in March, it said it would continue to process pending and renewal applications received through Thursday, October 4, according to the Los Angeles Times. With that deadline looming, law firms and legal clinics are scrambling to submit paperwork before time runs out. “We basically are in emergency mode,” said Angelica Salas, executive director of the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights. Meanwhile, attorneys are warning their ‘dreamer’ clients to prepare for worst case scenarios. The ‘dreamer’ program was created by President Obama in 2012 to allow young immigrants brought to the US illegally to secure work permits and temporary reprieves from deportation.

Podcast: What does Trump really want for the ‘Dreamers?’

President Trump has passed the buck to Congress on the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) or ‘dreamers’ program. Trump ordered a phase-out of the program over six months to give Congress time to find a solution. In this edition of “Can He Do That?” at The Washington Post, Allison Michaels and White House reporter David Nakamura talk to John Sandweg, former Immigration and Customs Enforcement acting director, as well as a ‘dreamer’ in the DACA program. Listen to the podcast here.

Video: What to know about the end of the DACA

What will “Dreamers” do now that the Trump administration has ended the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program enacted by his predecessor? Nearly 800,000 people will be affected by Trump’s decision. The Washington Post produced this video that examines the fallout from the end of the DACA.

Is the president playing games with Dreamers?

It’s important to remember that President Donald Trump isn’t just a real estate developer; he was also the star of a reality TV show, “The Apprentice.” And it appears that the president is using some of the same tricks that can raise ratings on Dreamers, the 800,000 young immigrants who would be affected by his plan to phase out the DACA program over six months. The Dreamers are being left to twist in the wind while Trump waffles on what he’s going to do about the immigration program. Dean Obeidallah examines the consequences of playing political football with the lives of young immigrants in this commentary at CNN.

The Immigration Effect

How do President Trump’s immigration policies affect the US economy? Trump wants the nation’s economy to grow four percent annually, while his budget assumes three percent growth. The Congressional Budget Office and the Federal Reserve assume a more modest two percent growth. Will limiting immigration work against the administration’s goal? According to an analysis by ProPublica, it will. Read more about ProPublica’s analysis here.

Judge expands ‘close family’ definition under Trump travel ban

A federal judge in Hawaii ruled late Thursday that the Trump administration’s narrow definition of “close family” should be expanded to include grandparents and other family members. US District Judge Derrick K. Watson also ruled that refugees who had assurances from resettlement agencies could also be exempt from the ban. More on the ruling is available at the Washington Post.

Sanctuary cities helping immigrants outwit ICE

immigrationShortly after taking office, President Trump signed an executive order threatening to stop federal funding to towns and cities who don’t help the Immigrations and Customs Enforcement (ICE) round up undocumented immigrants. In response, many mayors of these “sanctuary cities” across the nation vowed to continue or increase assistance to immigrants while refusing to cooperate with ICE agents. The Marshall Project takes a look at how some of these municipalities are taking up the fight on behalf of immigrants in this story.

 
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