Video: Traumatized children at the border

migrant familiesIn June, a Honduran woman seeking asylum in the US and her five-year-old son were forcibly separated at the Mexican border. A pro bono lawyer, Jodi Goodwin, helped reunite them after they spent a month apart. The Atlantic has produced a documentary called The Separated that shows the chaos and trauma caused by migrant families being torn apart.

New ABA president goes to South Texas to help reunite families

TexasAfter traveling to South Texas to see firsthand how the Trump administration’s family separation policy was affecting migrants seeking to enter the US, American Bar Association President Hilarie Bass promised to help reunite families and make sure they received due process. Now, new ABA President Robert Carlson is joining the effort, going to South Texas himself to work pro bono to help asylum seekers as part of the ABA’s commitment.

“The [ABA’s] policy supports protection of our borders, but in a fair and humane way,” says Carlson, of Corette Black Carlson & Mickelson in Butte, Montana. “We want to make sure that people get the due process that they’re entitled to under the Constitution.”

Read more about the ABA’s work to reunite migrant families here. 

American Immigration Council’s Statement on the Trump Administration’s Failure to Reunite Separated Families

migrant familiesThe Trump administration will miss the court deadline to reunite the nearly 3,000 children separated from their parents under the administration’s “zero tolerance” policy. The government’s failure to meet the deadline leaves hundreds of children separated from their parents, including 463 parents who have already been deported.

Aaron Reichlin-Melnick, an attorney at the American Immigration Council, led a team that interviewed over 90 parents detained in the El Paso, Texas area and learned firsthand how many felt pressured into relinquishing their rights or were unaware that they had done so. His account is captured in a declaration filed in the ongoing family separation litigation brought by the American Civil Liberties Union.

The following is a statement from Beth Werlin, Executive Director of the American Immigration Council.

“The government’s failure to comply with the court order to reunify the thousands of separated children and parents confirms the administration’s utter disregard for the humane and fair treatment of families coming to our country in search of protection. We have grave concerns about the large number of parents who have been coerced into signing papers ensuring their deportation. Many signed these papers without knowing what their options were and without first consulting an immigration attorney.

“No one should be forced to make decisions about their deportation or potential indefinite separation from their children under these circumstances. The U.S. government must ensure that no asylum seeker is pressured to waive their rights and prevented from having a fair day in court.”

Judge refuses extended custody of migrant families

migrant familiesA federal judge in California has denied the Trump administration’s request to hold migrant families in custody long-term, the Associated Press reports. US District Judge Dolly Gee called the administration’s request a “cynical attempt” to undermine a longstanding court settlement. The Justice Department had asked the judge to modify a 1997 settlement to allow the government to hold undocumented immigrant families for longer terms. Judge Gee rejected a similar request from the Obama administration three years ago. Her ruling then said that immigrant children couldn’t be held in custody for more than 20 days. The Justice Department says it’s reviewing the judge’s decision and hasn’t decided yet whether to appeal. More on the judge’s decision is also available at the Washington Post.