200,000 Salvadorans face deportation

The Trump administration says it will bring an end to the provisional residency status of about 200,000 Salvadorans who have been living in the US since at least 2001, according to the Washington Post. The move means the Salvadorans will now face deportation unless they meet a September 2019 deadline to either leave the country or find a way to obtain a green card. It’s the latest step by the Trump administration to limit the number of immigrants living in the US, either by limiting the number allowed to enter the country or by forcing those without legal status to leave. The Salvadorans affected by the move had been granted Temporary Protected Status (TPS) after earthquakes ravaged the South American country in 2001.

Bipartisan DACA plan unveiled

A compromise plan on immigration that would affect the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and border security has been unveiled by a bipartisan pair of House members, CNN reports. Texas Republican Will Hurd and California Democrat Pete Aguilar have been “quietly working for weeks” on the legislation, according to CNN. Both Representatives say they hope their proposal can speed up talks revolving around how to handle “Dreamers,” or young undocumented immigrants who were brought to the US as children.

AG claims Motel 6 gave guest info to immigration agents

The attorney general for the state of Washington alleges that Motel 6 gave information about thousands of guests to Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents in a lawsuit filed on Wednesday, according to HuffPost. Washington state AG Bob Ferguson had his agents investigate Motel 6’s practices after it was reported that the motel chain gave ICE agents in Arizona information about people who were registered as guests.

Ferguson’s office found that Motel 6 locations in Washington were also providing ICE with customers’ names, room numbers, license plate numbers and dates of birth, in violation of consumer protection and discrimination laws, the attorney general said.

Details on the AG’s lawsuit are available at HuffPost.

4 possible DACA options as deadline nears

Starting next March, almost 1,000 people per day could begin losing their protected status as their Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) permits begin expiring after two years, CNN reports. Congress is considering four possible replacements for the DACA which would allow qualified applicants a chance to stay in the country legally. CNN takes a look at the four proposals in this story.

Law-abiding immigrants hurt by Trump’s tough talk

President Donald TrumpAn editorial at The Washington Post points out that “the overwhelming majority of illegal immigrants in the United States have no criminal record.” But that hasn’t slowed the work of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents who are rounding up “not just criminal undocumented immigrants, but law-abiding ones as well.” Of the approximately 143,000 immigrants arrested by ICE in the past year, more than 25% had no criminal convictions. Most were guilty of non-violent crimes. The Post‘s Editorial Board examines the issues legal immigrants face in this editorial.

Mexico border arrests drop sharply under Trump

Mexico mapThe Department of Homeland Security reports that arrests of people trying to sneak across the US-Mexico border have dropped to their lowest levels in 46 years. The Washington Post reports that “During the government’s 2017 fiscal year, which ended Sept. 30, U.S. border agents made 310,531 arrests, a decline of 24 percent from the previous year and the fewest overall since 1971.” While the drop may be credited to President Trump’s tough talk about beefing up border security, in May the number of border arrests started climbing again. Meanwhile, the number of arrests of undocumented immigrants has risen 42 percent in the past year, according to Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). Read more about the numbers at The Washington Post.

Podcast: Inside Trump’s immigration crackdown

Expedited removal is a law enforcement tool that allows for rapid deportations for undocumented immigrants who are arrested near the US border. The Trump administration wants to expand the program, but opponents say it would give too much power to Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents. At Reveal by The Center for Investigative Reporting, this podcast breaks down the expedited removal program.

Video: What to know about the end of the DACA

What will “Dreamers” do now that the Trump administration has ended the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program enacted by his predecessor? Nearly 800,000 people will be affected by Trump’s decision. The Washington Post produced this video that examines the fallout from the end of the DACA.

Why is the government indefinitely detaining a man it cannot deport?

ICE agents immigrationMamadu Balde fled the civil war in Sierra Leone in 1999 seeking asylum in the US. Both the Bush and Obama administrations opposed his application for asylum. When his appeals ran out in 2012, Immigration and Customs Enforcement detained him and held him for more than nine months. But Sierra Leone could not provide proof of his citizenship and refused to accept him. So he was allowed to stay in America, so long as he checked in with ICE agents every six months. But now, Balde is being held in custody again because of “changed circumstances in policy.” Read more about his plight in this story at the ACLU website.

Find out if you could immigrate to the US under RAISE act

immigration and crimePresident Trump is supporting a new “merit-based” immigration bill that could cut in half the number of people who can legally immigrate to the US. The proposed system would rank applicants based on several factors, including a person’s age, education level, ability to speak English and income. The Reforming American Immigration for Strong Employment Act, or RAISE, was introduced by Republican Senators David Perdue and Tom Cotton. However, some experts say it’s unlikely to win Congressional approval. Time magazine has come up with a quiz that evaluates potential immigrants based on the proposed legislation. Would you be allowed to immigrate to the US under the RAISE act? Click here to answer a few questions and find out.