Appeals court upholds DACA

A federal appeals court has upheld an earlier ruling preventing President Trump from ending Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program implemented by President Obama. DACA protects young undocumented immigrants born in the United States from being deported. The ruling by the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals means the DACA program can stay in place for now. The Trump administration has already asked the Supreme Court to review the injunction, according to CNN. 

You can read the 9th Circuit’s ruling here. 

Eligible DACA recipients urged to renew applications

ICE agents immigrationFollowing an August 31st ruling by a federal judge in Texas not to terminate the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, immigrants who have qualified for DACA are being urged to renew their applications to stay in the country, even as uncertainty about DACA’s future remains. The Immigrant Legal Resource Center says the latest ruling by District Judge Andrew Hanen follows three previous judicial orders for the government to continue to accept DACA applications. While current DACA recipients can continue to renew their statuses, ILRC says the future of the program will remain murky until Congress can pass legislation addressing the issue.

Federal hearing on DACA in Texas

Court battles over the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) have left the program in limbo. On Friday, a federal judge in DC ruled against the Trump administration’s efforts to end the immigration program. Now, a federal judge in Texas is holding hearings on a case that would shut down the DACA program. Vox reports that the Texas judge is an immigration hawk likely to rule in favor of ending DACA. That ruling could leave DACA under mutually contradictory orders from two federal judges. Vox explains the legal limbo that could end with the Texas judge’s ruling.

New ‘dreamer’ lawyer devotes career to immigration

graduationLeila Fajardo-Giles was scheduled to receive her law degree from Suffolk University Law School this week, but she’s already chosen the path she’ll be focusing on in her new legal career: immigration. Fajardo-Giles is a dreamer, one of the hundreds of thousands of young people whose future remains cloudy because of the ongoing legal and political battles regarding the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program created by the Obama administration that is under siege from his successor. During her last year at Suffolk, Fajardo-Giles got some valuable experience working for the university’s immigration clinic, and helped a teenager gain asylum status. Read more about her ambitious plans at The Boston Globe.

Federal judge’s ruling ordering restart of DACA

A federal judge has ruled that the Trump administration’s ending of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) was “arbitrary and capricious,” and the program should be restarted. NPR reports that US District Judge John D. Bates gave the administration 90 days to “better explain its view” that the DACA program is illegal. You can read Judge Bates’ decision here.

Trump’s threats to DACA

undocumented immigrantsOver the weekend, President Donald Trump tweeted that there would be “NO MORE DACA DEAL” and blamed the failure on Democrats. At CNN, attorney Raul Reyes writes that Trump is ignorant of the nation’s immigration laws, pointing out that it was Trump himself who ended DACA in September of last year. Reyes says there has never been any realistic chance that a DACA deal could be struck. Read more about Reyes’ opinion at CNN.

The Washington Post also has analysis of Trump’s threats to DACA and how it reflects his presidency.

Time to abolish ICE?

ICE agents immigrationImmigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) has been in the news a lot lately, and not always in a good light. Does the US need a mass deportation strike force? A civil rights lawyer who’s running for Congress doesn’t think so. In an interview with The Nation, Dan Canon says he believes ICE should be abolished. “I don’t think a lot of people have any kind of direct experience with ICE, so they don’t really know what they do or what they’re about. If they did, they’d be appalled,” Canon told The Nation. He says ICE is “devoted almost solely to cruelly and wantonly breaking up families. The agency talks about, and treats, human beings like they’re animals.” Read more about Canon’s argument at The Nation.

A ‘dreamer’ waits and watches the clock run out

immigration and crimeLeezia Dhalla is a ‘dreamer,’ one of thousands of immigrants who were brought to this country as children. Her legal protections under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals run out in less than two months. She has lived in the US for 22 years, immigrating to Texas in 1996, but unless Congress does something soon to decide what will happen to her and other ‘dreamers,’ Dhalla will be forced to leave the nation she loves, as she told The Washington Post:

My employer will have to let me go; I won’t have a way to pay my rent; my family and friends will be inconsolable, knowing that I can be deported at any time. They’re the ones whose lives will be disrupted, alongside mine, if I’m deported to a country I barely remember. After 22 years of living the United States, my future — and the futures of about 800,000 young Americans like me — is in total limbo.

Dhalla says it’s an understatement to say that she and other ‘dreamers’ are disappointed in the lack of action by politicians to resolve the crisis. Read more about her personal story at The Washington Post.

Immigration advocate says ‘dreamers’ need more cities and states willing to defy Trump

CongressWhile a bipartisan bill introduced in Congress aims to address two of the more pressing issues on immigration, a path to citizenship for ‘dreamers’ and spending more on border security along the Mexican border with the US, the proposal may not have a good chance of getting President Trump’s signature. If Washington is unable to agree on a solution to the expiration of the DACA program in March, one immigration advocate is calling on cities, counties and states to find the courage to stand up to the Trump administration’s tougher policies and actions on immigration. Juan Escalante says with some states like Florida considering their own stricter immigration legislation, more states need to step up on behalf of dreamers like New York, New Jersey and California. You can read more in Escalante’s column at HuffPost.

Is the simplest solution to DACA the best?

immigrationAs lawmakers in Washington continue to wrangle over the best possible solution for ‘dreamers,’ or undocumented immigrants who were brought to the US as children, columnist Ryan Cooper suggests at The Week that the best solution may also be the simplest: complete amnesty. While some conservative critics have derided President Trump as “Amnesty Don” for his administration’s offer to make a DACA deal in exchange for limits on legal immigration, Cooper says the pathway to citizenship for dreamers may be the easiest:

Therefore, I would like to offer a contrary bold argument: All unauthorized immigrants, and all residents with some form of temporary permit, should be immediately granted permanent legal status.

Read more about Cooper’s radical recommendation at The Week.