Podcast: What does Trump really want for the ‘Dreamers?’

President Trump has passed the buck to Congress on the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) or ‘dreamers’ program. Trump ordered a phase-out of the program over six months to give Congress time to find a solution. In this edition of “Can He Do That?” at The Washington Post, Allison Michaels and White House reporter David Nakamura talk to John Sandweg, former Immigration and Customs Enforcement acting director, as well as a ‘dreamer’ in the DACA program. Listen to the podcast here.

Video: What to know about the end of the DACA

What will “Dreamers” do now that the Trump administration has ended the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program enacted by his predecessor? Nearly 800,000 people will be affected by Trump’s decision. The Washington Post produced this video that examines the fallout from the end of the DACA.

Can Congress save the DACA?

CongressAs President Trump decides to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program enacted by President Obama, members of Congress are gearing up for what could be a contentious fight over continuing protection for young undocumented immigrants. Both Democrats and some Republicans are indicating they’re willing to work on a plan to offer permanent legal status to young immigrants who have been in the country illegally. The president plans to phase out the DACA program over six months, giving Congress time to find a final solution. Details on the forthcoming political battle are available at The Washington Post.

Is the president playing games with Dreamers?

It’s important to remember that President Donald Trump isn’t just a real estate developer; he was also the star of a reality TV show, “The Apprentice.” And it appears that the president is using some of the same tricks that can raise ratings on Dreamers, the 800,000 young immigrants who would be affected by his plan to phase out the DACA program over six months. The Dreamers are being left to twist in the wind while Trump waffles on what he’s going to do about the immigration program. Dean Obeidallah examines the consequences of playing political football with the lives of young immigrants in this commentary at CNN.

Questions over Southern Univ. law professor’s estate work

Southern University law professor Dorothy Jackson has used an unusual and possibly unethical technique in naming herself as the attorney for executors of wills and estates. A law professor at LSU says Jackson’s actions are neither necessary nor customary. Jackson is now on administrative leave from the university pending an investigation into her role in drafting one of the wills. More details about the unusual methodology are available to The Advocate.

The difficulty in getting off of disability

As the government steps up its call to remove more people from receiving disability payments, statistics show that the number of recipients who return to the workforce is small: only 3.7% of disabled workers do within 10 years of receiving their first payment. The Washington Post has more in this story about how hard it can be for disabled people to go back to work.

Why is the government indefinitely detaining a man it cannot deport?

ICE agents immigrationMamadu Balde fled the civil war in Sierra Leone in 1999 seeking asylum in the US. Both the Bush and Obama administrations opposed his application for asylum. When his appeals ran out in 2012, Immigration and Customs Enforcement detained him and held him for more than nine months. But Sierra Leone could not provide proof of his citizenship and refused to accept him. So he was allowed to stay in America, so long as he checked in with ICE agents every six months. But now, Balde is being held in custody again because of “changed circumstances in policy.” Read more about his plight in this story at the ACLU website.

The problems with doing your own estate planning

Thinking about saving some money by doing your own estate planning? Perhaps you’ve decided to purchase one of those do-it-yourself wills that are available online. However, doing your own will isn’t always the best route for many people. The Wall Street Journal and Marketwatch take a look at some of the reasons why trying to save a little now could cost your family a lot later.

Using workers comp to deport undocumented immigrants

how the US immigration system worksInsurance companies are using a Florida law to deport undocumented immigrants who are injured on the job, according to a report by ProPublica and National Public Radio. The law, passed in 2003, made it a crime to file a workers compensation claim using false identification such as a Social Security number. In fact, the Florida law allows undocumented immigrants to be charged with workers comp fraud even if they’ve never filed a claim. Read more about how the Florida law is being used to deport undocumented workers in this report at ProPublica.

8 signs you should skip mediation and hire a divorce attorney

divorceAfter a marriage draws to an end, the divorcing couple must begin the trying work of untangling their legal, financial and child custody lives. While some believe the process will go well enough to consider mediation, the rest must hire family law attorneys. How does a couple know if mediation is right for them? Lifehacker has a list of eight signs divorcing couples should look for if they suspect that mediation won’t work for them.